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Creative Job Search Guide


Creative Job Search Guide


Career choice should be treated as a process rather than a snap decision. The process is
about you, your interests, your skills and your values. The earlier you start the process the
more time you will have to work through your options. Remember you are in charge of yo
ur
own career. You need to be proactive.
You are responsible for managing yourself and improving your skills, be it through in
-
house
training or further education.
Your career plan is not set in stone and will probably change as you progress in your career
.
The first stage in any career search is research. Find out as
much as you can about the job
in
which you are interested
go online, look at career videos, job descriptions, talk to relevant
people in that area.
This stage is essential, because no potenti
al employer will be interested in you unless you
can show them that you have at least gone to the trouble of finding out the basics.
Creative Job Hunting
A creative career search
involves a creative, active approach to researching careers and
making job
applications. Rather than being passive (reading books and surfing the Web) and
reactive (waiting for a vacancy to appear before making an application) you take the
initiative in finding out what is involved in a career or about job opportunities
.
How do
you do that?

Self
-
assessment:
knowing your
skills
,
interests
,
values
and
personality
.

Researching jobs

Information I
nterviewing

Networking

Take Action
-
Marketing yourself

Review
Disclaimer
:
Information is provided in good faith by CIT’s Careers and Counselling Service.
CIT, the Careers and Counselling Service, and
any contributing third party shall have no legal liability or responsibility for any individual’s decision
made on the basis of
this information.
Self
-
Assessment
You need to identify:

Your skills, e.g. communication skills, IT skills

Your interests, academic/non
-
academic

Your personal values i.e. what it matters to you, variety etc.

Your talents

Your academic achievement
to date

What motivates you

Your preferred work environment
Review skills you have achieved through:

Your
C
oursework

Your
Work E
xperience

Your
Free Time A
ctivities
Having identified the skills you possess you will need to work out which of these skills you
wish to use at work. An important part of the matching process is your values
e.g
.
helping
others, status, independence.
You also need to identify:

What you want to do

What you have to offer an employer
The purpose is, to be better acquainted with yourself
, be aware of your strengths, your
personality, which working environments appeal to you and what sort of a lifestyle you
want.
How can you do this?
Try out some self
-
assessment exercises
, such as:

www.careerspo
rtal.com
self
-
assessment;
career interest profiler

www.gradireland.com
careers report;
career planner

The Careers Service also has other assessment worksheets/psychometric tests which
we can use, to find out more
contact us and make an appointment.
Research, e
xplore the opportunities available
Many employers recruit graduates from all disciplines.
Do not develop tunnel vision about the types of careers your course qualifies you for. While
your certificate/degree is important, it should not be the sole determinant of your career
choice.